Research Study

Oral Calcium Supplementation, a Strategy to Reduce Kidney Stones in Crohn's Patients Living With a Small Bowel Resection
Principal Investigator 
Ben Chew

Overview

Body Locations and Systems 
ClinicalTrials.gov# 
NCT01735461
Status 
Recruiting
Study Start/End 
Sep 15, 2012 to Sep 15, 2017
Locations 
Diamond Health Care Centre, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver General Hospital
Name/Title 
Olga Arsovska, Research Manager
Phone 
604-875-4111 ext.62421
Purpose of Study 

Hospitalization for kidney stones in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) population is common, particularly among Crohn's patients who had a small bowel resection. This patient population experiences a lifetime occurrence of kidney stone formation as high as 25% accompanied with a high rate of recurrence (the typical rate of stone formation is ~10% in the non IBD population). Giving oral calcium is used to bind oxalate in the intestine in an attempt to reduce the amount of oxalate that is absorbed into the body and to reduce urinary oxalate levels. However, there are no defined guidelines for the optimum dosing of calcium. This study's primary objective is to scientifically define an appropriate range of calcium supplementation that reduce the level of oxalate found in the urine of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease.

Eligibility 

Visit ClinicalTrials.gov for more information.

Disclaimer 

Study Coordinators and Research Nurses cannot give medical advice over the phone. Telephone numbers and email addresses are provided for obtaining additional information on specific clinical research trials only. If you have specific questions which require clinical expertise, please call your primary care physician.