Research Study

Ureteroscopic Treatment of Intrarenal Stones - A Comparative Analysis of "Dusting" Versus "Basketing" With Holmium Laser Lithotripsy
Principal Investigator 
Ben Chew

Overview

Body Locations and Systems 
Kidney Stones
ClinicalTrials.gov# 
NCT01619735
Status 
Closed to Recruitment
Study Start/End 
May 15, 2012 to Dec 31, 2017
Locations 
Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver General Hospital
Name/Title 
Olga Arsovska, Research Manager
Phone 
604-857-4111 ext.62421
Email Address 
olga.arsovska@ubc.ca
Purpose of Study 

The purpose of this study is to evaluate outcomes of an established procedure for treatment of kidney stones that are present within the inner aspect of the kidney. This procedure is called flexible ureteroscopy, which involves placing a small camera through the urethra while anesthetized (asleep), up the ureter (the tube connecting kidney and bladder) and into the kidney to the kidney stone. Then, the stone is broken into tiny fragments using a small laser called a Holmium laser. While this treatment is a well-established option for treatment of these stones, there are several different techniques used to help eliminate them from the kidney. Some urologists treat the stone by a method called "active" extraction whereby the ureteroscope is passed back and forth into the kidney to remove all visible stone fragments. Others use a method called "dusting" whereby the stones are broken into tiny fragments or "dust" with the intention that achieving such a small stone size will allow the stones to pass spontaneously. There has not been a systematic and rigorous comparison of these techniques in terms of treatment outcomes. By collecting information on the success of treatment, the investigators hope to provide benchmark data for future studies of kidney stone treatment and improve the care of all patients who need surgery for their kidney stones.

The investigators hypothesize that the stone free rate for renal stone(s) 5-15 mm is around 90% and that the stone clearance rate with be 20% higher in those patients that undergo complete stone fragment extraction versus those that undergo stone dusting (residual fragments < 2mm).

Eligibility 

Visit ClinicalTrials.gov for more information.

Disclaimer 

Study Coordinators and Research Nurses cannot give medical advice over the phone. Telephone numbers and email addresses are provided for obtaining additional information on specific clinical research trials only. If you have specific questions which require clinical expertise, please call your primary care physician.