Research Study

Resynchronization/Defibrillation for Ambulatory Heart Failure Trial in Patients With Permanent Atrial Fibrillation
Principal Investigator 
Matthew Bennett

Overview

Body Locations and Systems 
ClinicalTrials.gov# 
NCT01994252
Status 
Recruiting
Study Start/End 
Jun 1, 2015 to May 1, 2020
Locations 
Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver General Hospital
Name/Title 
Melissa Bedford, Research Coordinator
Phone 
604-875-5120
Email Address 
melissa.bedford@vch.ca
Purpose of Study 

Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) are two common heart conditions that are encountered with an increase in death and suffering. When both these two conditions occur in a patient, the patient's prognosis is poor with a reduced quality of life. These patients are frequently admitted to the hospital and have increased risk of death. In these HF patients who are in AF all of the time, who would otherwise be a suitable candidate for an implantable defibrillator to prevent sudden cardiac death, whether adding pacing of both ventricles will reduce death and suffering. Other studies have shown that adding pacing to both ventricles is of benefit in HF patients with mild to moderate symptoms and have a regular heart rhythm. The Investigators now want to explore if this therapy will benefit those patients with a permanent irregular heart rhythm (AF). The Investigators will also be assessing the cost effectiveness of this treatment strategy and the life quality for these patients. This study may have a dramatic impact on the way the Investigators manage these patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure and may improve the outlook and well being of these patients.

Eligibility 

Visit ClinicalTrials.gov for more information.

Disclaimer 

Study Coordinators and Research Nurses cannot give medical advice over the phone. Telephone numbers and email addresses are provided for obtaining additional information on specific clinical research trials only. If you have specific questions which require clinical expertise, please call your primary care physician.